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LC&DR

Signature: Green trains are best!

Bio: Railway modeller since 1952 (started with Hornby O gauge Clockwork), progressed to Tri-ang OO/HO in 1956 and still model in OO and O. Dabble a bit in 304mm to 1 foot, HO, TT, and OO9. Joined BR in 1964, retired from Network Rail 2006 and then did 6 years on NYMR. Still actively involved in Institution of Railway Operators and occasionally volunteer at the NRM.

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LC&DR

9021 posts

 I may be wrong about this but I understand the R56 Baltic was only made in black until 1960 , I have five black ones  some with  Mark 2 and some with Mark 3 couplings. The maroon one first appeared in 1961 as R56S with smoke. 

 

The mark 3 coupling was introduced in 1959 and by 1961 all new OO models were fitted with it .Therefore all maroon ones should have mark 3 couplings.

 

The picture in the OP is of one of the post 1961 maroon models AND it clearly has the Mark 3 coupling.  So  the problem should not be with the one pictured but with another one. It should be reasonably simple to replace the Mark 3 coupling with a plastic one, as sold by Bachmann and Dapol.  The Mark 2 couplings do present a bit of an issue but the geometry of the leading and trailing bogies is such that if double heading is essential then a bogie swap should be the best solution.

Green trains are best!

LC&DR

9021 posts

 As RAF96 wisely suggests read the foillowing post -

https://www.hornby.com/uk-en/forum/track-extension-pack-guide/?p=1

The crucial principle is to make sure the surface on which you will be laying your track is  flat and free of bumps and distortion and the track sits flat upon it.

 

Cork is used by some modellers mainly to deaden the noise of the trains and it can be used to even out irregularities in the baseboard, although this might also be regarded as 'slap-dash'. However once ballast is glued on to the cork between the sleepers some of the sound deadening property of the cork will be lost.

 

My loose laid layout for when the grand-kids come to play is laid on three rectangular insulation boards braced with 2x1 battens which are rested on the dining table. The boards are 2' 0" x 4' 0" which fitted together give me a 6' x 4' layout. I then lay a couple of old velvet curtains (green) over the top before I lay the track..

 

The boards are joined by backflap hinges with the pins driven out and replaced by bent 2" nails, screwed to adjacent corners, the insulation boards being nailed and glued to the battens for strength.

 

 

 

Green trains are best!

LC&DR

9021 posts

 A drop of lubrication (not too much mind) will make them run better. Unlike modern trains the old Hornby Dublo diecast locomotive appreciates a tiny amount of 3 in 1 oil on the coupling rod pins, axle bearings, gear wheels and other bearing surfaces. Applied as a drop on the end of a pin the top and bottom armature bearing will need a little bit of oil, BUT DON'T GET IT ON THE BRUSHES OR COMMUTATOR. One drop is enough.

 

Similarly the axle bearings of steel wheeled wagons and carriages need modest oiling too.

 

This advice is the direct opposite of what applies to any trains by other makers including modern Hornby which need miniscule amounts of plastic friendly lubricant only as described in the instruction sheets which come with them. Never, ever use 3 in 1 (or any other mineral oil) on any modern trains!

Green trains are best!

LC&DR

9021 posts

 Most 0-6-0 tender type locomotives throughout the UK were primarily used on medium weight goods duties. This included the J36.

 

The scope of these duties included transfer work from yard to yard of general goods traffic. More importantly they would handle yard to station trip work, including 'pick up' goods which brought loaded wagons for unloading and empty wagons to be loaded  from the marshalling yard to the local station goods yard, and then returning to the marshalling yard with those wagons already unloaded / loaded. 

 

Pick up goods would travel along a line of route calling at different goods yards on the way, attaching and detaching, so from station to station the composition of the train would change.

 

While at the goods yard the 0-6-0 would be used for shunting the wagons into the correct places for loading / unloading, and making up the train to proceed to the next station.

 

Where there were private sidings belonging to factories and collieries the locomotive would exchange wagons which would be moved internally by the firm's own locomotives. Special exchange sidings would usually be provided where inwards wagons would be detached, and outward wagons attached.  It was common to find a notice board within the exchange sidings stating main line locomorives should not pass it.

 

On return to the marshalling yard the 0-6-0 would leave its train in a 'Reception' siding where a shunting engine would then sort out the wagons for the next service. The 0-6-0 would either go on shed for coal and water, or toddle round to the departure sidings where the shunter will have set up another train for other sidings in the area.

 

In terms of what would be in the train, coal was undoubtedly the most common load, most stations had at least one coal merchant who received a dozen ot more wagons per day.  Many trains consisted only of coal wagons especially in coal mining areas, where collieries needed empty wagons every day, filled them and sent them out daily. Over half the railway's fleet of wagons were exclusively for coal traffic. 700,000+ vehicles in the 1940s.

 

Hopper wagons were usually limited to industrial users, coal for merchants invariably arrived in small box type mineral wagons, initially 6, 7, or 8 plank high 13 ton mineral wagons (expecially before 1948)  but latterly in steel bodied 16 ton mineral wagons.

 

Perishable and vulnerable traffic, ( e.g. cases of tobacco, washing machines, cases of bottles and barrels of various alcoholic drink etc.) would be in covered vans sealed with devices checked by the railway police, these had to go inside the goods shed for security. Less vulnerable goods would be carried in open wagons but then usually covered by a tarpaulin sheet to keep the load dry. If there was room this went into the goods shed too.

 

Bricks sand and building materials were conveyed in open wagons. Builder's merchants often had a part of a goods yard where they could receive and store their materials.

 

Timber would be in open wagons or bolster wagons, and placed near a crane to make unloading easier.

 

Cattle in cattle vans, would be placed alongside a cattle dock so the animals could walk off the wagon but be kept penned and secure until collected by the butcher or farmer.

 

The 0-6-0 was a 'maid of all work' and could be called upon to work local passenger and parcels trains too. However it was hauling the goods that was their 'bread and butter'.

Green trains are best!

LC&DR

9021 posts

 You will enjoy it I am sure, the old Meccano 3 Rail was very robust, and fortunately there is still a load of track about to pick up second hand.

 

The Hornby Railway Collectors Association https://www.hrca.net/  supports collectors and users of this series and they hold frequent auctions of appropriate material (locos, rolling stock, track and accessories), usually from former owners who are no longer with us. I have greatly increased my own collection from this source. They also offer their members a directory of other members who produce spare parts or undertake repairs. You also get 10 full colour magazines a year.

 

You may indeed find that you get 'hooked' on three rail, it has a peculiar charm all of its own.

Green trains are best!

LC&DR

9021 posts

 Hornby Dublo three rail track consists of a printed tinplate base with rails made of different material, usually nickel silver, but sometimes plated brass or plated steel.  The centre rail is seperated from the base by plastic or fibre insulators. The rails are joined by rail joiners, usually nickel silver, or plated brass.The electrical continuity of the centre rail is achieved by interlocking tongues of similar material.

 

The tinplate base may rust if the printed surface is scratched or otherwise damaged and are exposed to moisture, such as storage in a cold attic. The rails will be more resistant to corrision but if these are plated steel as opposed to the other materials abrasion may remove the plating and rust may ensue.

 

Remove dust and dirt with a dry cloth, if you detect corrosion you will need to decide how severe this is. Bad corrision may well consign the track into the dustbin. Minor corrosion may be kept at bay with a proprietry rust inhibitors.  Clean the rail head with IPA (Iso-Propyl-Alcohol)  using a soft cloth. Nickel silver or brass rail will tolerate cleaning with an abrasive track rubber but avoid using this on plated steel.  (You can check if it is steel with a magnet of course)

 

Check the continuity tongues and the centre rail for distortion. If these are in contact with the base there will be a short citcuit. If so gently adjust them.

 

Green trains are best!

LC&DR

9021 posts

You remember correctly PP

 

 A few surplus Bulleid Third class opens, by now classified Second, were transferred to the Eastern and Scottish Regions in 1965, and painted in lined maroon. 1467/9/70/2/4/86/91/9 & 1505 went to the ER,1466/71/9/82/4/9/95/8 1500/2/4 went to the ScR. The last ones in sevice in Scotland lasted until 1970.  All the Bulleid carriages on the Southern disappeared at least a year or two earlier following electrification to Bournemouth.

 

Round about 1966 BR decided that pre-Nationalisation designs which had a considerable amount of timber in their construction , which included almost all of  them, were unsafe, and were progressively scrapped, being replaced by all steel BR Mark 1 and Mark 2 carriages.

Green trains are best!

LC&DR

9021 posts

 As they were "Type 4" then they would be used on those sevices usually reserved for "Type 4s"  such as Brush 4 (47), Peak (44, 45, 46) , D200s (40) , Usually the heavier and faster passenger trains, and heavy long distance goods.

 

The very top category of express passenger trains were in the hands of Type 5s like the Fifties (50), Westerns (52), and Deltics (55) and the very heaviest goods (e.g. MGR)  (classes 56, 58, 59 60 etc.) .

 

Lesser services, for example branch line, suburban, local and short working, would be allocated to type 2 and type 3 locomotives such as Brush 2 (31), Derby type 2 (24/25), or English Electric type 3 (37), but these might be traded up especially when used in multiple.

 

The most remarkable multiple working was the permanent use of two English Electrc type 1 (class 20) in multiple as general purpose local goods haulers with up to 2000 hp available they were at least equivalent to a type 3  or smaller type 4 and with 8 axles motored .they were sure footed haulers  Another exceptional example of multiple working was the use of three EE type 3 (37) on heavy iron ore trains in South Wales.

 

Green trains are best!

LC&DR

9021 posts

Undoubtedly a interesting and nice looking model.

 

I have 5 of them, all black, and some have mark 2 couplings , and others mark 3.

 

As the NZR is 3' 6" gauge as an OO gauge model it runs in track 2.5mm too wide, in contrast to 4mm scale standard gauge models on OO gauge  which run on track 2.33mm too narrow. I haven't checked the model dimensions, but I wonder has Triang adjusted the scale to correct for this?

Green trains are best!

LC&DR

9021 posts

 I think Sarah was saying change the bogie completely. Like myself I am pretty certain she knows all about the Mark 2 coupling, and its problems. Peco used to make nylon replacements in Peco style for Triang Mark 2s which required the rivet removal and use the springyness of the nylon to couple..

 

The Mark 2 coupling is the problem, but later made bogies are different. They use the Mark 3 which is sometimes secured with a screw sometimes with a brass  'rivet' which is easy to remove and replace with a self tapping screw.

 

The bogie can simply be changed by unscrewing the shouldered pivot screw in the chassis, remove the Mark 2 bogie, and attach the Mark 3 bogie with the same screw.

 

If you don't want to do this then you are going to have to live with the problem. Ellocoloco option 1.

Green trains are best!

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