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LC&DR

Signature: Green trains are best!

Bio: Railway modeller since 1952 (started with Hornby O gauge Clockwork), progressed to Tri-ang OO/HO in 1956 and still model in OO and O. Dabble a bit in 304mm to 1 foot, HO, TT, and OO9. Joined BR in 1964, retired from Network Rail 2006 and then did 6 years on NYMR. Still actively involved in Institution of Railway Operators and occasionally volunteer at the NRM.

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LC&DR

10179 posts

Airfix kits were a very important part of my youth. I built many Airfix aircraft, ships, cars, and of course the Railway rolling stock and buildings*. With Meccano construction outfits and Triang Trains it occupied most of my spare time, and taught me how to put things together and make them work. 

 

*Kitmaster railway kits too came along at the same time and added to my delight.

 

Of course there are modern equivalents (almost) with Parkside rolling stock kits now marketted by Peco, and Slaters too. I have moved up to building wagons in 7mm scale (eyesight isn't what it used to be) but I do have a bit more pocket money nowadays.

Green trains are best!

LC&DR

10179 posts

As it is getting to "that time again" I would like to express my hope that the following items might be added to the Hornby range.

 

Night Ferry sleeping cars and baggage cars

 

Maunsell L1 4-4-0

 

Pullman 1951  type U parlour and kitchen cars (Festival of Britain)

 

Maunsell U1 2-6-0 three cylinder mixed traffic locomotive.

 

Well I can wish can't I?Embarassed

 

Green trains are best!

LC&DR

10179 posts

Link may not work, post is a 'sticky' at top of forum.

Green trains are best!

LC&DR

10179 posts

Yes you can add tracks to the basic set to make the run longer. There are in fact Hornby extension Packs to help you do this, although you can add track pieces you choose yourself.

 

Chrissaf’s guide can be found here: A Guide to Getting Started with Track Extension Packs

Green trains are best!

LC&DR

10179 posts

Wooden sleeper points in stretches of concrete sleeper plain line was (and still is) very common. 

 

Concrete rail bearers used in points have to be specially cast to accomodate the fastenings used to hold down the rails so it is cheaper just to keep a small number of sizes and use standard turnouts than to put in bespoke sets of P&C. Where non-standard geometry is required  it is still normal to use wooden point timbers.

Green trains are best!

LC&DR

10179 posts

It has been raised here before, but the NER was one of the most important pre-Grouping companies having a monopoly in the North East of England including all of Northumberland and Durham and a significant proportion of England's finest county, Yorkshire. 

 

Unlike the LMSR the LNER chose to continue using pre-Grouping NER designs so many survived long into British Railways service, and in fact the J27 proved to be the last pre-Groupiung class to work on BR.

 

The NER has to date been poorly represented in ready to run models, with for a long time only the J72 being available. The Q6 from Hornby was a complete surprise, and at last someone is going to add a J27.

 

A little anecdote about the B16 class.

 

In my days working in the Regional Controll Office at Newcastle upon Tyne, I worked alongside many railwaymen whose experiences went back to the 1950s and were able to speak with personal experience  Part of our job was to tell signalmen which trains were to be given preference over others and usually this meant sidelining a freight train to allow an express passenger train (EP) to get a clear run.  Our patch extended from Northallerton to Berwick upon Tweed, and out to Corby Gates just outside Carlisle. Using huge graph paper charts we monitored the running of all trains, and by looking at the slope of the line we drew in coloured pencil we could tell if a train was doing OK or if it was in difficulties. 

 

In my time there every thing was diesel hauled, but many of my colleagues had their roots in days when trains were all hauled by steam. A freight train running well might be allowed to run ahead of an EP with tighter margins than were officially allowed, and 99 times out of 100 they got away with it.  They said however that the  B16 did not perform very well, and if York Control informed them a down freight train had a B16 on the front, they would be prepared to side line it at the first opportunity. Giving a B16 a 'run' would nearly always result in delay to following services.

 

The V2 was always the preferred option for a fast freight train.

Green trains are best!

LC&DR

10179 posts

Certainly there is a good jusification for introducing a RTR B16 being one of the more numerous classes of mixed traffic LNER locomotives.

Green trains are best!

LC&DR

10179 posts

Oh dear!

 

Terminology garbled again!

 

The track piece where one line passes over another is called a CROSSING, or more correctly a DIAMOND CROSSING. 

 

A crossover is a combination of two points (two left, or two right hand points normally) which allows trains to cross over from one parallel line to another . Like this -

 

Green trains are best!

LC&DR

10179 posts

Most modern train sets use OO gauge  "Set Track" which follow a geometry adopted by Triang / Hornby many years ago.

 

The rail section is "Code 100" and the distance between the rails is 16.5mm (which is the same as HO as used in the USA and Europe) .

 

Track which conforms to this standard is sold by Hormby, but also by Bachmann and Peco and which are mutually compatible.

 

Hornby track is identified by stock numbers with an R prefix. Peco on the other hand has a prefix ST, Bachmann track has a numeric code starting 36-.

 

The straight track sections are all thge same length and curves are of similar radii. Most modern trains need second radius or larger.

 

Some track can be found from other European and US makers, but before buying this you need to check that it is Code 100 rail. Also the geometry may differ  It is safest to stick to Hornby, Bachmann or Peco.

 

Peco offer alternative track systems, most notably Streamline, which uses a different geometry and a larger range of points and crossings. This is intended for modellers who want track of more realistic appearance. It can be used with train set track but adjustments will be needed using flexible track, cut and bent to shape, to make it match the rails in the train set. This is intended for the more advanced modeller.

Green trains are best!

LC&DR

10179 posts

I did once use a Princess Elizabeth chassis with a Kitmaster Biggin Hill kit to create 34033 "CHARD" . At one time you could buy brass covers to stick on to the outside of the wheels to represent the Boxpoc wheels but I used car body filler and painted the shapes on. (This was the early 1960s) .

 

The Biggin Hill kit is still available from Dapol.

Green trains are best!

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