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The Doc

Signature: The Doc

Bio: Modelling mainly Eastern Region in the early BR era.

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The Doc

455 posts

@walkingthedog

That looks good but Doc. Bet they lose a few balls in the turntable. 

Yes , and it's the only ground I know of where the umpires complain of the movement behind the bowler's arm because Flying Scotsman being turned.  Which reminds me, I've go a sight screen made of wooden coffee stirrers somewhere.

The Doc

The Doc

455 posts

You don't have to make it exactly to scale.  On our school layout the pitch is only 180mm (scale 45 ft, or 15 yards, rather than 22 as it should be) but it doesn't look particularly short.  I guess that's because most of us view a cricket pitch on TV from the camera's eye view behind the bowlers arm, where it appears very foreshortened.  Our whole ground is about 500mm in diameter (about 41 yards, and looks a bit on the small side - ideally if it was 3 times the length of the pitch it would look better.  I don't have a photo to hand of the whole pitch at present, but here's a view of "Right arm, over the wicket, from the Pavilion End:

The Doc

The Doc

455 posts

Unless they have changed the spec again, the Railroad R3284 TTS Scotsman has, if I remember correctly, a three pole motor and flywheel (just like those other big Railroad locos Duke of Gloucester, Cock o' the North and Tornado).  I suspect there is an error in the technical details on the Hornby page.  Changing to a 5 pole can be done but isn't a simple like for like replacement as they aren't 100% identical externally.  See BB's link,

The Doc

The Doc

455 posts

I use foam underlay as it gives very quiet running, and do exactly the same as M-R above.  Woodland scenics fine ballast in between the tracks to reduce the shoulder, espcially in sidings/goods yards/engine shed areas. Humbrol Acrylic dark earth M29 is a good colour - I give the whole thing a very brief spray then wipe the rail heads clean with a damp cloth.  I also cover the area around point blades to avoid any sprayed paint reducing conductivity.

The Doc

The Doc

455 posts

I couldn't track down a photo of my LMS Ivatt, but here's one of a Stanier Mogul in exactly the same livery:

The Doc

The Doc

455 posts

I think you should have a go at repainting it yourself - I did exactly the same myself years ago with a green version.  The LMS plain black livery is about as easy as you can get, with no lining to worry about.  You should be able to find "pressfix" transfers here:

https://hmrs.org.uk/transfers.html?transfer_group=6540&transfer_scale=11883&transfer_type=11886

There are other companies that do waterslide decals, but I cannot remember their names at the moment.

My own method was to spray in gloss black (Halfords spray paint), then apply the transfers, and finish off with  Humbrol matt varnish (also a spray can).

 

  

The Doc

The Doc

455 posts

Wow.  Thank you to LC&DR for sharing your knowledge with us (on so many occasions).  It is great to have such detailed posts to help us with our modelling (or playing trains, if you prefer that expression).  Although I model the East Anglia in the 1950s  I found this really useful.  I reckon I can get away with a few very faded wooden bodied PO wagons, which means the ones I just repainted in pristine grey will have to be weathered carefully!

The Doc

The Doc

455 posts

@debe45,

 

If I were you I would start by designing a fairly small and simple layout that has scope for expansion, then build plywood baseboards for it.  Try it in your garage as it is without spending months of time and effort, or a lot of money, getting the garage to be an "ideal" location for your layout.  That's basically what I did and I have no regrets.  My layout started as a 6' x 3' board and is now 18' x 6', still incorporating the original board and much of the scenery that was originally on it.

The Doc

The Doc

455 posts

My layout has been in the (double) garage for 15 years, so the answer to the original question is a definite 'yes'.  I'm probably doing lots of things wrong, as there is minimal insulation, the doors are not draft proof or water tight round the edges and I once had a small stream running through it when our neighbour's guttering collapsed in a storm.  I also have hot and cold running creatures in the garage (+ a grass snake once) and they invariably leave evidence of their visits, particularly the mice, so I wash my hands after each modelling or play session.  Despite all this, I have only come across two problems and they both relate to Superquick card buildings.  The roof of the good shed warped after about 5 years, and the sellotape I had used to stick some windows in place also gave up, so all windows are now stuck in place with evostik.  Metcalfe models, that tend to have two pieces of card laminated together for the walls, seem very robust and don't mind the damp in the garage.  My locos don't seem to have suffered either, with the oldest ones still running as well as when I first got them.

The Doc

The Doc

455 posts

I've used old steel rail as a wagon load - single straight pieces look good on a bogie bolster wagon.

The Doc

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