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Chrissaf

Signature: Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

Bio: Retired, but spent my career working in IT and Electronics. So using a PC to control things is what rocks my boat.

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Chrissaf

8070 posts


Apart from being rather unsightly, the R8242 DCC Power clips are a potential fault liability. It is much better to solder the dropper wires directly to the rails (outside or underside but not inside the rails). Soldering to Nickel Silver rails is child's play. Nickel Silver accepts solder really easily.

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With regard replacing R8232 DCC Point clips with soldered braid. Since you have already stated that you will be installing an evenly distributed DCC Bus then soldering braids would be an unnecessary overkill. If you have a BUS installed, then you don't need DCC Point clips. One or the other, not both together. Therefore, if you need a short term solution because you will installing the BUS later, then use the R8232 clips initially, but remove them when the BUS is installed. Apart from which, replacing R8232 DCC Point Clips with soldered braid in the manner that you have described, would entail soldering on the inside of rails. Blobs of solder could impair the flange of the rolling stock wheels. You should only solder wires on the underside or outside of rails.

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With regard Power Districts and Circuit Breakers. Unless your layout is going to be huge then that is probably overkill too. Remember each power district needs to be electrically isolated with Insulated Rail Joiners (IRJs) at strategic locations. Power district design needs a lot of planning.

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In fact, would it help avoiding polarity dyslexia, so long as I keep inserting the red cable and the black cable always in the same slider positions.

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No it wouldn't.....because if you insert the power clip on the other side to the track compared to clips located in other parts of the layout, you have to reverse the wire connections to eliminate short circuits. This drawing below explains (this drawing is an extract from my downloadable PDF at the top of the General Discussion sub-forum).

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As you can see, the polarity of the attached wires is subject to the location of the clip on the layout track, because the clips are not electrically symmetrical.

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Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

Chrissaf

8070 posts


@Dombey

I didn’t say it should be covered by warranty.................

 

Yes you did.........in your post on Page 1 timestamp 06:36 and I quote:

It’s pretty shoddy service on Hornby’s part in my view - there is no doubt that it is covered under warranty.

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However I'm pleased that Hornby have agreed to do something for you, for which they had no legal liability to do.

Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

Chrissaf

8070 posts


It is very rare for sound to default to 'on'. The likelihood is (being a used second-hand purchase) that the sound had been left 'on', and the loco just physically removed from power with the sound still playing prior to it being sold to you. Such that somehow the 'sound on' command had been remembered and acted upon when you placed the loco on your live track, which in itself would be unusual.

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It is more normal for sound to be 'off' when initially powered up on a DCC track. You then call up the 'loco address' on the DCC controller you are using and you send a function F1 command to turn the sound 'on'.

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What happens when you send an F1 command?

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TIP: As this is your first post, just be aware that the 'Blue Button with the White Arrow' is not a 'Reply to this post' button. If you want to reply, scroll down and write your reply in the reply text box at the bottom of the page and click the Green 'Reply' button.

Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

Chrissaf

8070 posts


That is true if you are watching a train moving. On DCC you can even hear the short happening as a quiet buzzing noise. The only thing is, that Anton say he gets an OL showing on the Select when no trains are on the track.

Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

Chrissaf

8070 posts


What lights? [you used the term "Train". A train is the loco and what it is hauling behind it, so lights could possibly mean carriage lights].

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Coach carriage lights?

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Loco directional lights (white front / red rear)?

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Is this DC Analogue or Digital DCC control.........this makes a difference to the possible answers. I know that you have placed this post in the Hornby DCC section, but people do sometimes mis-post in the wrong forums and it is not wise to make assumptions.

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If it is the loco white and red directional lights and you are using DCC control....have you sent a function F0 command from your DCC controller to turn the lights 'on'?

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TIP: As this is your first post, just be aware that the 'Blue Button with the White Arrow' is not a 'Reply to this post' button. If you want to reply, scroll down and write your reply in the reply text box at the bottom of the page and click the Green 'Reply' button.

Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

Chrissaf

8070 posts


Just one thing to try before you start taking the layout apart. Lofts tend to be quite relatively dark even with electric lighting if no windows are present. I would go round the whole layout with the nozzle of a vacuum cleaner and systematically cover every inch of the layout. There may just be a tiny bit of metallic debris, perhaps a track pin or strand of stray wire. Something that could generate an intermittent short circuit fault. The idea being that a vacuum cleaner is likely to pick up some debris that is not necessarily easily visible to the eye.

Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

Chrissaf

8070 posts


With regard the OL situation. The only realistic option to find an intermittent short on an empty layout with no locos on it, is substitution. Realistically, it logically has to be one of the points that is intermittently faulty, since all the other potential culprits (like capacitors in power tracks for example) have now been dealt with.

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Since the whole layout is effectively live, then any point, even one on a distant siding could potentially be the culprit. Most of the points are either a left hand or a right hand one. If you could temporarily borrow one of each from some less used part of the layout, say a couple of the dead end sidings for example. Then, systematically work your way round the layout, substituting 'one point at a time'.

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Be sure to allow ample testing time to really be sure that the OL fault is still present or not, before moving on to the next point. Hopefully, you will get to a position where after substituting one of the points, the OL fault goes away and doesn't come back. The point that is then in your hand at that time must therefore be the faulty one. This is going to be a long winded disruptive process, but it is the only one I can suggest, given the whole of our 'back and forth' dialogue we have had to date on this forum has in the main systematically discounted other possible causes.

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Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

Chrissaf

8070 posts


Thatoneguy.......

Can I humbly suggest that you do not use the blue button. This is not a 'Reply to this post' button. It is best if you write your reply in the 'Reply to this post' text box at the bottom of the page and click the green 'Reply' button.

Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

Chrissaf

8070 posts


Since you already have the 4 Amp power supply I am discounting the power supply from the equation. That does actually answer the question as to why you actually see the OL display. OL does not normally display at all when using the standard Select 1 Amp supply. With the 1 Amp supply, the Select normally just goes through a power restart when a short occurs.

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In some ways it would probably be better if you still get the OL display on a basic test track as that would put the fault area back into the Select. If the test track can't replicate the OL fault even after an extended running time. Then it will be very difficult and time consuming to try and diagnose an intermittent short on your quite large layout.

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Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

Chrissaf

8070 posts


Yes it would. I'd forgotten about that statement being made somewhere in previous posts.

Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

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