M Menu
b 0 Items s

Stroudley's 'Terriers' and the Collett 57' Bow Ended Suburban Coaches

Stroudley's 'Terriers' and the Collett 57' Bow Ended Suburban Coaches

Hello and welcome to February’s edition of The Engine Shed – your direct line to the Hornby Development team. It has been just over a month since we came to you to look through the 2019 range and pick out the new tooling models that we would be looking at in detail throughout the year here in our blog.

We mentioned it last time too but we are very keen to demonstrate the journey each project goes through here in The Engine Shed. We have accomplished that to some extent so far in the blog but we are planning to make this the focus throughout 2019. Offering all the usual development samples and information you have come to expect, we will be adding more detail from the team members themselves, offering more unique and interesting information on these up and coming models.

To that aim we are concentrating on two newly tooled projects today both of which will be joining the Hornby range shortly. We are also starting the journey with several other projects in this instalment with promises of much more to come. The 2019 range is absolutely packed with new releases and we will do our best to bring you as much detail as we can in a structured way over the coming months.

With that in mind let us begin with a newly tooled locomotive that has caught the eye of many enthusiasts.

A1/A1X Class 'Terriers'

As soon as the 2019 range was announced in early January it became very clear that modellers would not have long to wait before the first projects would start entering the market place. One of these early projects was the A1/A1X Class, ‘Terrier’, which was expected only a couple of months after it was announced.

However, before we look at the model itself, we begin with a history of the ‘Terrier’, offering the full account from our brief excerpt in January’s edition.

Hornby Terrier Research

In 1870, the London, Brighton & South Coast Railway (LB&SCR) was struggling to cope with its increasing share of the London suburban traffic, with seventy-two different classes of locomotives in traffic designed by John Chester Craven, the Locomotive Superintendent of the LB&SCR. A hopelessly uneconomic and unsustainable policy, Craven refused to compromise on the issue of standardisation and resigned on 31 January 1870, to be replaced by William Stroudley. Much of the line south of London was of poor quality and subject to challenging gradients and a locomotive with a lighter axle loading and shorter wheelbase than the existing fleet was urgently required. Stroudley’s answer was a light six-coupled tank design and his first drawings were completed in June 1870, although this proved to be too small for suburban use. Drawings dated May 1871 evolved the design, however it was not until November 1871 that a third set of drawings were approved, leading to an order for six ‘A’ Class (later to become A1 Class) locomotives. Construction at Brighton Works began in March 1872, with the first two examples, 71 Wapping and 72 Fenchurch leaving the works on 28 August 1872.

Hornby Terrier Engineering Sample

'Terrier' First Engineering Sample

Hornby New Tooling Terriers

All six 'Terrier' samples for 2019

The distinctive ‘barking’ exhaust note of the locomotive led to the class becoming known as ‘Terriers’ and the class proved popular with the crews, being comfortable, easy steaming and mainly reliable, although the condensing pipes were later removed by Stroudley’s successor and the steam brake proved to be erratic in operation. A further forty-four locomotives were built at Brighton Works and of the total fifty, all except six were operating in the London area.

Hornby Terrier R3767
Hornby Terrier R3767

A series of cylinder modifications took place between 1892 and 1900 and by this point the class had extended their working area out to Portsmouth but with many traffic duties requiring the use of bigger locomotives, the decision to reduce the class to fifteen examples was taken. This led to locomotives being sold on to other operators, as well as being scrapped with examples ending up on the Isle of Wight, the Kent & East Sussex Railway, the Great Central Railway extension, London & South Western Railway and the South Eastern & Chatham Railway. The introduction of motor-train services from 1905 arrested the decline of the class and the A1X reboilering from 1921 onwards gave the remaining ‘Terriers’ a new lease of life. Scattered around Southern England, the type continued in service right up until 1963, and beyond, with ten locomotives being preserved beyond withdrawal.

Hornby Terrier R3767 Scenic

As we discussed in January’s special 2019 range edition, the tooling for the ‘Terrier’ has been created in such a way to do justice to the extensive modifications and variations that could be found with the ‘Terriers’. However, rather than list these variations off as we have done in the past, we are actually able to show you instead.

Hornby Terrier Different Parts
Hornby Terrier Different Parts

The Hornby 'Terrier' parts and variations, created from early samples

The differences and changes can be seen on this exploded view, with plenty of variations included. Created recently by our model maker, this truly shows just how much goes into a new tooling project and all the different elements involved with one of these models. 

Hornby Terrier R3768
Hornby Terrier R3768
Hornby Terrier R3780
Hornby Terrier R3780

With the models so close to release, the development is appropriately far along in the process with the team having received almost all the samples, which they have extensively checked and made changes on.

From the early ‘First Shot’ from the tooling, we can also offer you the first look at the Decoration Samples and Approval Samples here in The Engine Shed. This offers a real glimpse at what you can expect, but all the usual caveats are still in place - what you see here is not the complete finished item you will receive should you decide to add this model to your collection.

Hornby Terrier R3781
Hornby Terrier R3781

The 2019 ‘Terriers’ are R3767 32655 and R3768 32636 in BR livery with R3780 ‘Stepney’ in LB&SCR livery. R3781 ‘Rolvenden’ is in K&ESR livery, R3782 751 in SE&CR and finally R3783 2662 in SR livery. Each variation will also be available as a DCC Fitted version, which can be found by adding an ‘X’ to end of the product code.

Hornby Terrier R3782
Hornby Terrier R3782
Hornby Terrier R3783
Hornby Terrier R3783

Collett 57' Bow Ended Suburban Coaches

As for the first newly tooled coaches you can expect this year, we have a little more information to share with you. To truly reflect the journey this project has undertaken we need to start right at the beginning. While no research visit was possible for the 57’ Collett Bow Ended Coaches, the team made use of information gathered from an older project, as well as additional information sourced from a whole variety of different places.

However, as always, we must first begin with the full history of these suburban coaches.

Hornby Collett 57' Research

As part of Charles Collett’s coach improvement programme, between 1927 and 1929 fifty-six non-corridor vehicles were each built to the D98 Brake Third and E131 Composite diagrams and fitted with 7ft Bogies. Each type was built in two Lots; 1376 and 1388 for the Composites and 1377 and 1389 for the Brake Thirds, forming twenty-eight 4-car sets that were initially allocated to Birmingham, London and Chester.

Hornby Collett 57' Research

By 1937, the 4-car Sets on the Birmingham Division became officially classified as ‘B Sets’, being formed up as Brake-Comp-Comp-Brake. Over time this led to confusion with the West Country ‘B Sets’, which were formed of two Brake Composites but in the Midlands area these two car sets were classified as ‘D Sets’. The working of the ‘B’ Sets in the Midlands area was extremely complex and involved the Sets being spread across the division overnight, ready for operations the next morning. Like the heavier ‘A’ Sets, the ‘B’ Sets could be strengthened for peak services by adding loose coaches or an additional set. Sets could sometimes even be used on excursion duties, as photographed in 1937 in the Bournemouth area but this was a rare occurrence caused by shortages of corridor stock.

Hornby Collett 57' Research

Following the Second World War, some of the Sets were dispersed and disbanded, while others were formed into 3-car Sets from 1954/55 onwards, the addition of a Third Class vehicle to the Composite and Brake Third coaches. This period marked the beginnings of withdrawals and scrapping of the type was completed by 1962.

Hornby Collett 57' Research

We would like to specifically thank both Roger Horwood, the Carriage and Wagons Manager at Didcot, as well as Barry Scott, the Carriage Steward at the Great Western Study Group, for their assistance with the project. The help they provided was vital to the project and helped the team immensely. We were aware that information for these coaches was not widely available but through specialist help and hard work, enough information was found to enable design work to begin.

Hornby Collett 57' Research

With the research file compiled, the designer began work in late 2017 with amendments and minor changes continuing until early 2018, when the design was fully completed. Making use of the previous Hornby project, extra detail and design was still required and involved hours of painstaking work.

One large part of the project was that these coaches are either left or right handed. Particular to the GWR and seen from their formations, each coach would be run such that the second half of the formation would be ‘mirrored’. Details such as the roof vents and orientation of the Guards compartment would then change sides depending on where the coach was. This was seen in numerous research photographs where satisfying lines of roof vents could be seen. Ensuring this accuracy in the newly tooled models was paramount enabling enthusiasts to run these coaches in accurate formations.

Hornby Collett 57' Coaches CAD

2019 Collett Coaches as created by the designer in CAD

However, this was not the only additions as plenty of extra detailing was added including separately fitted door handles, sprung buffers (which can be either oval or round), separate grab rails, hand rails, a detailed underframe and interior.

Hornby Collett 57' Coaches CAD

From the designer’s perspective, the project encountered very few problems and during their project reviews only minor matters needed to be addressed. This was not only pleasing to everyone involved but also a testament to the designer's hard work. However, that is not to say the Collett 57’ Bow Ended Coaches did not have their challenges.

As previously mentioned, the comparative lack of historical sources was a constant throughout the design and creating accurate bow ends required a great deal of trial and error.

Hornby Collett 57' Coaches CAD

We are confident you agree that the finished article is an accurate representation of the originals and we are pleased to advise you these coaches will soon be available. Indeed the first couple of GWR coaches have now arrived (R4874 and R4875) and we are expecting the remainder of the 2019 offering to be released shortly (R4876/A, R4877/A, R4878/A, R4879/A, R4880/A and R4881/A).

Hornby Collett 57' Stereo Samples

Collett 57' Suburban Coaches Stereolithography and Engineering Sample

Hornby Collett 57' Stereo Samples

As for our focus on the journey of each project, the Collett 57’ Bow Ended Suburban Coaches may be considered as the first 2019 project to have completed its full journey as reflected here in The Engine Shed. From research to design, various samples and then the chosen model's release, we will look to offer a similar experience with the other newly tooled projects in the coming months. This will offer an insight into the whole pricess of producing accurate models.

Hornby Collett 57' Stereo Samples
Hornby New Tooling Collett 57' Coaches

Peckett B2 and Ruston & Hornsby 48DS

Not all our 2019 newly tooled projects will be fully described in just one edition, with so much ground to cover we will be looking at other models across multiple editions of The Engine Shed. While the full history and development work can wait until the next edition, we wanted to get the ball rolling with two samples that you will have already seen, these being the Peckett B2 and the Ruston & Hornsby 48DS.

Hornby Peckett B2 Samples

Peckett B2 Stereolithography model and 'First Shot'

The early stereolithographic model and first shot from the tool will soon be joined by the all-important Decoration Sample, which we will be sure to share with you here in The Engine Shed. These two small models are already continuing the tradition as laid down by the popular Peckett W4 and we will have much more to share with you in the March edition.

Hornby Ruston & Hornsby 48DS Samples

Ruston & Hornsby 48DS Stereolithography model and 'First Shot'

Model Rail Scotland

The Hornby team have made their way north of the border ahead of Model Rail Scotland. A great way to kick off the year, we will be in Glasgow with a full range of samples and ready to answer all your questions. If you have been following us on social media, you will have seen that not only did we offer a chance to win free tickets to the event, but we have also been preparing ahead of the first event of the year.

Hornby at Model Rail Scotland 2018

The Hornby stand at the 2018 Model Rail Scotland event

We will be covering the show as normal on our social channels too, but we will try to have the usual write up for you here in March’s blog too. If you are attending the show, we hope you have a fantastic time and please do come by the stand and speak to the team.

Hornby at Model Rail Scotland 2018

We hope you have enjoyed these two development stories behind the first two 2019 new tooling projects we are expecting this year. As we have mentioned, we shall be continuing throughout the year, offering you the perspective from the Development team on each project. As you will have undoubtedly noticed throughout the history of The Engine Shed, the Development team are the first members of the team to begin work on a project and are hugely involved for several months, offering a unique and interesting perspective.

While projects will undoubtedly bridge across multiple editions of the blog, we will also be tracking the Princess Royal and MK3 SD coaches throughout the entire year. Due for release right towards the end of 2019, we have the perfect chance to showcase each step of the journey almost as it happens, giving you a special insight into these flagship releases. As and when the team take a major step forward, we will be sharing it with you here too, hopefully enabling you to follow along and share in that unique feeling when both are released into the market place.

If you have enjoyed this month’s instalment please do let us know either on Facebook, Twitter or on our Official Forum.

We will see you again soon with more information on several 2019 projects and until then,

Happy Modelling!

The Engine Shed team

Return to Engine Shed homepage

 

© Hornby Hobbies Ltd. All rights reserved. 

Share this post

Membership Restricted Product