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Chrissaf

Signature: Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

Bio: Retired, but spent my career working in IT and Electronics. So using a PC to control things is what rocks my boat.

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Chrissaf

11838 posts


Whilst you wait for a reply, perhaps you would spend a few minutes reviewing the TIPs in the TIP page link below:

 

TIP: As a newbie poster on the forum, just be aware that the 'Blue Button with the White Arrow' is not a 'Reply to this post' button. If you want to reply to any of the posts, scroll down and write your reply in the reply text box at the bottom of the page and click the Green 'Reply' button.

 

See also – further TIPs on how to get the best user experience from this forum.

https://www.hornby.com/uk-en/forum/tips-on-using-the-forum/

.

Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

Chrissaf

11838 posts


The socket in your picture is a '25 pin D socket' it is not a standard socket for model railway use. It originates from the 1980's [and before] and was a common component on IT (Information Technology) hardware for Data Communications. There are also 9 Pin and 15 Pin variants of this socket too. The 15 Pin version can usually be seen on old computer graphic cards and monitors for VGA graphics [now pretty much obsolete these days]. The 9 Pin varient was usually seen being used as Computer RS232 COM ports [pre dates USB].

 

The wiring of your 25 Pin socket will be completely custom and designed by the person who originally built your layout board. Only the original builder will be able to tell you its function and how it is wired. It will not be compatible with any similar socket as found on commercial model rail hardware such as the HM2000.

 

Model railway builders have used the D type sockets to allow them to build a layout that has an element of modularity in it i.e the ability to join boards together or join / disconnect a control panel or other control elements from / to the layout. Control elements such as point operation switches and wiring. Exhibition layouts for example might use these connectors. The Pins on the connector are quite thick and robust so are convenient for constant plugging and unplugging, they also include locking screws on the plug that once done up, prevent the connector from being accidently pulled apart [note the fixed threaded nuts at each end of the connector in your image ... these mate with the threaded screws on the plug].

 

The bottom line, is that in the absence of the original builder, only YOU can determine the function of the socket by tracing out all the attached wires to it and see what they connect to. Then draw out the circuits on paper to make sense of it.

 

The standard numbering convention for the D25 Male Plug is thus:

 

 

Note that on the socket, the female socket will start numbering from Pin 1 on the left [the image is for the male plug]. Or in your case, the bottom right of the socket as it is upside down in your photo.

 

 

Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

Chrissaf

11838 posts


Roger doesn't say what he has retilted your thread to. I may be wrong, but I assume it is this one.

https://www.hornby.com/uk-en/forum/tts-decoder-in-class-37/?p=1

Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

Chrissaf

11838 posts


....if my Select starts up 10, 20, 30 then it is up to date with the latest firmware?

 

Your question was actually answered in my reply to the OPs question when I wrote - see below

 

Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

Chrissaf

11838 posts


Trying to turn off the Firewall, WILL NOT fix your issue, this has been proven before.

 

It should also be all 'Green' and not 'Red' as your image shows.

 

Compare your Firewall settings to the screen shot ones shown in this existing thread. Right click the published images and choose 'View Image' to see the image larger full screen to read the detail.

https://www.hornby.com/uk-en/forum/elink-program-track/?p=2/#post-154731

 

I will contact HRMS tomorrow.

 

Be aware that HRMS do not publish a 'telephone number'. Hornby Customer Care at Margate is NOT where HRMS are located. HRMS is a very small independent separate software company from Hornby with a very small number of staff (we believe possibly only one person). HRMS only communicate via email support@rail-master.com or the 'Help' interface within RailMaster. There is no telephone support from HRMS.

Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

Chrissaf

11838 posts


Gold paint perhaps? or gold leaf application?

Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

Chrissaf

11838 posts


...decoupler ramp with motor or motor ready.

 

Hornby do do a 'motor ready' version, the R8244

 

https://www.hornby.com/uk-en/remote-uncoupler-unit.html

 

 

This product is included in the Hornby RailMaster track plan layout tool. So that a DCC address can be assigned to it and operated by clicking a screen decoupler icon.

 

A R8243 point motor and a free Accessory Decoder port is required to make this work in RailMaster. RailMaster has a specific entry in the .INI file to set the 'ramp-up' operating time [the default is 5 secs, but can be edited]. In the absence of RailMaster any free-standing DCC hardware controller can operate it too.

 

The only downside is that it is designed for the R8243 Solenoid point motor. Being 'Surface Mounted' makes it rather unsightly in my opinion.

 

If the layout is DC controlled, then the R8243 can also be operated manually with a switch just like any other Solenoid point motor.

 

EDIT: Others posted whilst I was busy finding an image to post.

Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

Chrissaf

11838 posts


Cool

Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

Chrissaf

11838 posts


If the maximum supply to the motor is 12 volts and you put two motors in series, then you will only get 6 volts maximum across each motor. So therefore at best, only half speed. Also, if the motors are in series the current drawn will also be less than one motor on its own. The over-all effect is that the combined traction force of two motors in series is likely to be less than one motor on its own.

 

If you put the two motors in parallel, then they will both have 12 volts across them, but the total current drawn will double and the overall traction force will also double, but only if twice the drawn current capacity can be maintained.

 

The issue with two motors will always be rotational speed synchronisation. Even if the two motors are the same motor models, the chances are that one of them will become the more dominant one and want to rotate faster than the other for the same voltage input.

Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

Chrissaf

11838 posts


Just to add, to what Rob has written. On some occasions and in some circumstances, if a ComMod feels that a particular post needs Hornby to see it, then the ComMod may actively bring that post to Hornby's attention. But Hornby do not generally monitor the content on a regular consistent basis outside of the exceptions that Rob has mentioned.

 

I don't do Social Media myself, but I am led to believe that Social Media is where Hornby focus their customer feedback monitoring resources. So if you want to bring a specific issue to Hornby's attention, then you are more likely to have it seen by Hornby on Social Media than in this forum.

Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

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