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STrack Gradient

Sadowson

2 posts

Hey everyone, this is my first post on the forums so I hope i'm in the right place.

I'm having an issue with trains going up a track gradient. the distance is roughly 70cm long and rises about 10cm, which seems to be too steep for any of my trains

with rolling stock to pull up.

Locomotives by themselves have never had a problem going up and there is no evidence of speed degredation when this happens. However when I attach even a few items of rolling stock, none of my locomotives are able to get

up. they get roughly halfway up and stop with the wheels spinning. Even when I approach the rise at full speed, it is not enough.

the layout is running DCC.

I have an idea of using sandpaper on the tracks to make it ever so slightly rougher (So

therefore more grip... I hope) But its something that I definitely would not do unless someone more experienced can tell me that its okay. the track and the engine wheels have been cleaned multiple times.

poliss

7352 posts

Sandpaper or anything like it is a definite no no. You'll make scratches in the track that will attract dirt.
Someone should be along soon to tell you what the recommended gradient is.

Get off the line Bobby.

Fishmanoz

9752 posts

Gradient person on line poliss. Unfortunately Sadowson, your problem is that the gradient is much too steep. From the dimensions given, you are using 1 in 7 or 14%. The maximum recommended gradient is at most 1 in 20 or better 1 in 30. 1 in 30 will only

give you a rise of just over 2cm in your 70cm length. You really need to have a much longer run to get up the full 10cm rise - in fact you need 300cm to do it ideally, or at least 200cm.
If you want to see Hornby's recommendation with one of their products,

go to https://www.hornby.com/shop/track/track-accessories/r658-inclined-piers/ and the info includes the recommended spacings to get the right incline.
And I agree with poliss, under no circumstances should you sand the track.

and thanks for all the fish

Sadowson

2 posts

Now that I think about it, 70cm was probably an understatement and I think its actually about a meter in length.

Unfortunately, changing the track gradient is very difficult but I think I might be able to level it out a bit better...

Aside

from adjusting the height of the track, is there anything else that I can do to modify the track and make the engine grip better?

Many thanks for your replies. I had no intention of sanding the track unless you all said it was a good idea.

poliss

7352 posts

Don't forget that tracks can go down as well as up. You can add extra weight, but that might put strain on the motor.

Get off the line Bobby.

Gregd99

970 posts

On my layout I have curved inclines with a rise of 80cm over about 1.6m. this corresponds (I hope :-)) to 1 in 20. Curves impose an increased load on the locos.

various locos make this climb/descent - Class 08, Fowler, Class 20 - but typically they

only have 2 passenger coaches or 3 goods wagons.

The construction is light plywood cut in semi-circles supported by wooden piers. I found it quite fiddly to get right and had a few false starts.

Greg

the ferret

732 posts



Now

hang on a minute, Sadowson, we're talking railways here. 10cm height increase for 70cm horizontal distance is 1 in 7. This is steep for a road. Heavy vehicles are banned etc.

The steepest sections of mainline in Britain are at 1 in 30. One was the old

Folkestone Harbour line where as many as four locos were needed to lift the cross-Channel ferry trains both up and to provide adequate brake vacuum down. The other is at Dainton, South Devon. Put "5043 Earl of Mount Edgcumbe at Dainton Tunnel" into Youtube

and see some REAL fireworks! You have? Impressive, isn't it?

So that is 3cm up in a run of about a metre. You would need a good run at that! Probably a four coach train would be the limit for a loco with NEW traction tyres.

I experimented and

found that for a six coach train about 1 in 75 is the absolute limit! That is why my 8 metre loft layout is all on the level!

the ferret

732 posts



Now

hang on a minute, Sadowson, we're talking railways here. 10cm height increase for 70cm horizontal distance is 1 in 7. This is steep for a road. Heavy vehicles are banned etc.

The steepest sections of mainline in Britain are at 1 in 30. One was the old

Folkestone Harbour line where as many as four locos were needed to lift the cross-Channel ferry trains both up and to provide adequate brake vacuum down. The other is at Dainton, South Devon. Put "5043 Earl of Mount Edgcumbe at Dainton Tunnel" into Youtube

and see some REAL fireworks! You have? Impressive, isn't it?

So that is 3cm up in a run of about a metre. You would need a good run at that! Probably a four coach train would be the limit for a loco with NEW traction tyres.

I experimented and

found that for a six coach train about 1 in 75 is the absolute limit! That is why my 8 metre loft layout is all on the level!

the ferret

732 posts



Now

hang on a minute, Sadowson, we're talking railways here. 10cm height increase for 70cm horizontal distance is 1 in 7. This is steep for a road. Heavy vehicles are banned etc.

The steepest sections of mainline in Britain are at 1 in 30. One was the old

Folkestone Harbour line where as many as four locos were needed to lift the cross-Channel ferry trains both up and to provide adequate brake vacuum down. The other is at Dainton, South Devon. Put "5043 Earl of Mount Edgcumbe at Dainton Tunnel" into Youtube

and see some REAL fireworks! You have? Impressive, isn't it?

So that is 3cm up in a run of about a metre. You would need a good run at that! Probably a four coach train would be the limit for a loco with NEW traction tyres.

I experimented and

found that for a six coach train about 1 in 75 is the absolute limit! That is why my 8 metre loft layout is all on the level!

the ferret

732 posts



Now

hang on a minute, Sadowson, we're talking railways here. 10cm height increase for 70cm horizontal distance is 1 in 7. This is steep for a road. Heavy vehicles are banned etc.

The steepest sections of mainline in Britain are at 1 in 30. One was the old

Folkestone Harbour line where as many as four locos were needed to lift the cross-Channel ferry trains both up and to provide adequate brake vacuum down. The other is at Dainton, South Devon. Put "5043 Earl of Mount Edgcumbe at Dainton Tunnel" into Youtube

and see some REAL fireworks! You have? Impressive, isn't it?

So that is 3cm up in a run of about a metre. You would need a good run at that! Probably a four coach train would be the limit for a loco with NEW traction tyres.

I experimented and

found that for a six coach train about 1 in 75 is the absolute limit! That is why my 8 metre loft layout is all on the level!

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