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SHornby DCC Power And Accessories

Bigmandanc

20 posts

Hi there, I have a SCARM layout designed for my room, but I am a total newbie when it comes to DCC. I was wondering if any of you Hornby Masters could have a look at my SCARM, and help me figure out what wiring I need etc, I have researched it, but I cannot quite wrap my head around it. Any help appreciated. I can PM in either SCARM format or Atlas format (I make the sections in SCARM, then load into Atlas to join together Tongue Out )

 

Kind Regards

 

Dan

RAF96

8785 posts


Community Moderator

Dan

Unfortunately the forum doesn't have a PM facility and the rules forbid posting of personal details like phone numbers or email addresses.

 

Just take a screen grab of your Scarm plan on your PC and post it to the forum using the black and white icon at the top of the reply box (just to the left of the smiley face). The picture will not appear immediately as it has to be moderated not by us Mods but by the site Admin, during UK office hours only.

 

People here can then look at it and make comment.

Rob

Halton Brat - Running Win 10, 64-bit - RM (Pro-Pack) with Elite as Controller-A, Select as Walkabout and E-Link as Controller-B - Locos are mostly TTS. - http://myweb.cytanet.com.cy/honnor/

Bigmandanc

20 posts

Here you go. Best I can do right now. Is there another popular board that you guys use where I can upload this stuff?

 

Kind regards

 

Dan

Chrissaf

6841 posts


Community Moderator

The triangular section highlighted in yellow is a WYE. It will need to have a RLM (Reverse Loop Module) fiited in addition to some IRJ (Insulated Rail Joiners) else you will get a 'Short Circuit' when you try to use it. In fact there are two WYEs, the one highlighted in yellow, plus another created from the loop next out from the yellow section. The vertical transfer track (in the left hand side of the yellow box) is common to both WYEs.

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Assuming the TT is a Hornby R070, then that will also need to be modified for a DCC layout (again to prevent DCC short circuits). 'How To' is decscribed in these 'forum user' generated tutorials.

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R070 Turn Table DCC Modification

http://www.hornby.com/uk-en/forum/r070-hornby-turn-table-to-dcc-including-images/?p=1

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R070 Setting Up configuration in RailMaster

http://www.hornby.com/uk-en/forum/r070-turntable-configuration-in-railmaster/?p=1

Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

Chrissaf

6841 posts


Community Moderator

Further to above, what is going on here. Please explain.

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Is this supposed to represent tracks on two different levels. If so, then I can't see how you can possibly get enough run up space to have a workable slope gradient.

Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

2e0dtoeric

5338 posts

Two more Wyes, as well, both on that central section, where there are two more sets of cross-overs! Would the one module cover all three?

if it works first time, you did something wrong!

Chrissaf

6841 posts


Community Moderator

Eric, that whole design in the central area is effectively a series of nested (Russian Doll - one inside another) Reverse Loops. The design is a bit of a RLM nightmare and would need very careful assessment given the sheer number of track to track cross-overs included in the design as well. At first glance, I would think it would need a minimum of two RLMs and a lot of IRJs to resolve. I would want to know the answer to my second question (my "Further to above...." post) before I expended time trying to formulate a RLM proposal.

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It is a case of trying to cram as much as possible into a small space. SCARM lets you do it. SCARM doesn't comment on the practicalities of whether the design is technically workable or not.

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PS - Just spotted that SCARM is an anagram of CRAMS Smile

Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

Chrissaf

6841 posts


Community Moderator

Another potential issue is the input rail to the TT. Being a Y point the TT input is effectively directly connected to a curve track. There is a very high risk that will create a consistent derailment location. It is reported on the forum that the Hornby TT works best if there is a straight track piece directly connected to the input track. The suitability of a 'point' for the TT input is compounded because the Hornby TT generates a slight sloping rise on the input / output track pieces. Hornby points need to be perfectly flat, if they are not going to cause derailments or loss of loco pickup power. Not sure that a point 'toe end' directly connected to a TT input track would have enough space for an underboard point operating motor.

Chris........ Making the wood in the trees visible.

2e0dtoeric

5338 posts

SCARM/CRAMS/SCRAM!

Whatever - an electrician's nightmare for a dc layout, too!

if it works first time, you did something wrong!

Fishmanoz

9398 posts

Given you are new to this Dan, may I suggest that you think some more on what you want to do on your layout and how you want to do it.  You may well find it can be achieved with a simpler design.

and thanks for all the fish

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